An environmental resource for East Tennessee Businesses

Bioenergy Day to educate students on rise of biofueled world

Students of all ages will soon have a little more bioenergy knowledge, as the fourth annual Bioenergy Day will present opportunities to learn about the rise of a biofueled world.

Hosted by the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge national Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bioenergy Day will feautre a 3-D printer and examples of 3-D printed objects, including a 3-D printed table made of renewable bamboo produced by ORNL and 3-D printed giveaways.

There will also be opportunities to speak to bioenergy experts in the rapidly expanding field, as well as ORNL internship opportunities available for high school and college students.

National Bioenergy Day celebrates the importance of bioenergy, which is the use of agricultural waste and forestry byproducts to generate heat and energy. There will be several showcases throughout the United States to display bioenergy facilities and the bioenergy supply chain.

Bioenergy is also responsible for thousands of jobs that work to keep American forests healthy and utilize organic byproducts like forest trimmings, industry byproducts and agricultural residuals. The U.S. gets 2.5 percent of its energy from bioenergy, according to the National Bioenergy Day website.

The free event will feature many contributors, including the Creative Discovery Museum of Chattanooga, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Genera Energy Inc. and the U.S. Forest Service.

The event will be held Oct. 19 from 3-5 p.m. at the UT Arboretum Auditorium in Oak Ridge.

News Sentinel Staff contributed to this post.

More contractors needed for Knoxville Extreme Energy Makeover

By: Ed Marcum 

The Knoxville Extreme Energy Makeover program, launched to help weatherize the homes of low-income families, has been a boon to contractors.

John Underwood, whose company Castles of Choice LLC does subcontract work on the homes for ABC Weatherization, said KEEM was an opportunity that came along at just the right time.

"We were a young company and ABC got us involved in the program," he said. "It really helped us get going," he said.

Part of the idea behind the program is to help minority-, women-owned and other small businesses, and organizers want to get more of them involved, said Erin Gill, director of the city's Office of Sustainability. To accomplish this, a workshop will be held at 10 a.m. on Oct. 21 at the Knoxville Area Urban League headquarters at 1514 E. Fifth Ave.

There will be a presentation to explain the program, and a chance to talk with representatives and learn how to get involved, Gill said. There is a bit of urgency because the program is running out of time and money, and organizers want to get as many homes weatherized and as many contractors involved as possible, she said.

"The program is in its final year, so we want to make sure the doors are wide open for people who want to participate," Gill said.

The program kicked off in August 2015, funded by a $15 million grant awarded by the Tennessee Valley Authority to the city, the Community Action Committee, Knoxville Utilities Board, and the Alliance to Save Energy. CAC administers the program.

"Generally, CAC goes into low-income homes that have electric heat, and if the family is income eligible and meets other qualifications, CAC evaluates the home and does a full audit to find out what the home needs in terms of energy efficiency," Gill said.

CAC makes a list of improvements needed and hires a contractor to do the work. This usually involves sealing doors and windows, replacing or repairing HVAC units and water heaters, and/or installing insulation and repairing duct work.

However, a stipulation of the TVA grant is that all the $15 million should be spent by September 2017.

"We are ramped up and will continue at full speed until we are out of money," Gill said.

There still is much to be done, she said. The program aims to weatherize 1,278 homes and has done 725 so far. To quicken the pace, more contractors are needed, Gill said. Only nine general contractors are involved, she said. One of those is ABC Weatherization.

Jim Beardsworth, co-owner of the company, said it has about 26 subcontractors, representing about 40 or 50 people, that work on KEEM projects.

Beardsworth said that a subcontractor must be trained and accepted as a TVA contractor, and he believes that probably inhibits some contractors from trying to get KEEM work. The workshop will provide information and help guide subcontractors through the process, he said.

The Smarter Cities Partnership, a coalition of 20 organizations looking to make homes in Knoxville's core more energy efficient, is looking for funding sources to continue KEEM after the current funds run out, Gill said.

So far, the program has had an impressive impact, Gill said. It has resulted in $6 million being invested into the community, including $4.5 million to small businesses.

The weatherization jobs that have been completed thus far have resulted in an estimated 3.7 million kilowatt-hours of electricity saved, enough to power about 225 average homes, she said. The energy savings have prevented an estimated 2,600 metric tons of carbon dioxide from being produced, which is the equivalent of taking 549 cars off the road.

For more information on KEEM or the workshop, call 865-244-3080 or

Oak Ridge advisory board appoints nine members

Nine local residents will have the chance to provide input this fall to the U.S. Department of Energy on its Oak Ridge Reservation cleanup mission.

The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board appointed the new members, giving the group a total of 21 members and two non-voting student representatives.The DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management briefs the board periodically on its top cleanup projects. The federally chartered citizen's panel then discusses each project and provides the DOE with community perspectives through formal recommendations.

The nine new members of the advisory board are all residents of Oak Ridge, Knoxville an the surrounding areas. The members are:

Kathryn Bales, senior nuclear engineering student at the University of Tennessee

Christopher Beatty, quality assurance engineer with Innovative Design Inc.

Rosario Gonzalez, cafateria manager at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Oak Ridge

Eddie Holden, retired transportation logistics manager who worked with OREM for 10 years and Yellow Freight for 31 years

Deni Sobek, science teacher at Oak Ridge High School

Fred Swindler, former vice president and current consultant in regulatory affairs for IsoRay Medical Inc.

Venita Thomas, occupational safety and health safety specialist with Alliant Corp.

Rudy Weigel, retired industrial hygienist, bioenvironmental engineer, environmental scientist and hazardous waste program coordinator

Phil Yager, Anderson County Commissioner for District 8 in Oak Ridge.


Flexibility helps TVA keep prices down

By: Mamie Kuykendall

Customers of the Tennessee Valley Authority are paying lower rates than two-thirds of the country's energy consumers, and experts cite the agency's unusual structure as a major factor for the low costs.

"We are a unique bird, a federal corporation, which means the TVA board has the ability to set our rates without going to a public commission like others have to," TVA spokesman Scott Brooks said. "They have to propose (changes) and make their case, while our board has the ability to set rates. That's the fundamental difference."

At 9 cents per kilowatt hour, TVA prices rank in the lower third of the top 100 utility retail rates in the country. Its industrial rates are lower than 85 percent of other agencies. This is partly because the TVA sets rates as low as possible to cover costs, according to Brooks, while investor-run utilities have to show profits for shareholders.

"We are not a profit-based company," Brooks said. "Any extra is returned back into our system. We don't have shareholders."

TVA's price increases have remained equal to 1.5 percent of retail rates each year for the past three, according to its website. This increase, in line with the cost of inflation, was made possible by the reduction of $600 million in operating costs over the same time span.

Generating sources and fuel costs are two factors primarily responsible for electricity price fluctuations, according to the website, and the agency generates electricity through a variety of means -- such as coal, natural gas and hydro -- to manage the price changes.

The agency uses different resources to meet fluctuating energy demands. For example, combustion turbine natural gas plants are used when loads are high, while nuclear and hydro power plants, which have the lowest costs, can be used full-time.

Electricity generation prices can be impacted by outside factors such as fuel costs and droughts, something that the diverse portfolio is able to offset. If there is not enough water to use hydro, coal can be substituted. These options allow the TVA to keep costs low, according to its website.

The agency plans to continue cost-control efforts in the years to come. An investment of $2 million to $3 million will be made over the next three years to maintain clean, safe energy, without an operating budget increase, according to the site.

The low rates are bringing billions of dollars to the Tennessee Valley, according to the TVA. In the first part of this fiscal year, $6.5 billion in investments were brought to the area, and more than 53,000 jobs were brought or retained.

Both businesses and individuals maintain a high level of interest in green living and energy conservation, according to Brooks.

The TVA, which provides electricity to seven states, is offering incentives in exchange for energy-efficient utility upgrades through its EnergyRight Solutions program. Founded in 2008, the program offers up to 10 cents per kilowatt hour saved for pre-approved projects, such as lighting, HVAC, and door and window upgrades, according to the TVA website.

In the Northeast region, businesses and industries collectively save about 30 million kilowatt-hours each year through the program, according to Tom Irwin, program manager for the Northeast region. These figures do not include residential savings.

"We've had a tremendous response to the program," Brooks said. "Part of the reason is that there is a demand for reducing energy bills and saving energy. We think that's a good thing."

Energy efficiency is important to the TVA, because it helps to avoid a heavy peak demand period, which would force the agency to build more power plants.

"The less energy needed, the less we have to pay for fuel to run our plants," Brooks said. "We've seen tremendous interest and response for homes, businesses and corporations all around the valley to help companies reduce their consumptions."

As a result, the TVA boasts one of the smallest carbon footprints of all Southeastern utilities, according to the website, and close to 55 percent of its generating sources are carbon free. The agency has invested around $6 billion in equipment for emission control, and it expects to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 40 percent in the next four years.

Aries Energy powers way into community solar

Aries Energy, a Knoxville-based company founded in 2011 to deliver simple, profitable and responsible renewable energy solutions, has jumped head first into community solar, one of the hottest topics in renewable energy.

Community solar is a large-scale system that allows solar energy to be deployed through a utility.

"The very nature of the business structure of the project is a win for everybody," Aries president Harvey Abouelata said. "If it goes through a utility, the utility's not left out of the picture."

A utility has power distribution, management expertise and could perform the ongoing operational maintenance, said Abouelata. Public partners then could be brought into the business structure to take advantage of tax credits, incentives and depreciation.

"You have the scale of the community, the tax credits and incentives because you have a private partner in there, so that's lowering the costs, and then you have the community," Abouelata said. "If I'm an individual that's renting, and I want to participate in clean energy, how do I do it? I can subscribe to this community solar project that's controlled by the utilities and I can put my money where my mouth is.

"It's really exciting, because whatever level I want to participate in ... I can be an individual and subscribe to essentially one panel, or I can be a corporation and subscribe to half a megawatt. But, I don't have to worry about people walking on my roof or construction or maintenance. That's all done by the utility. Again, it's a win for everybody."

According to Abouelata, that's why community solar is a popular topic.

"We joined the South Carolina Clean Energy Business Alliance, and one of the first meetings we went to, the topic was community solar," he said. "I just came from one of the subcommittee meetings that (Nashville) mayor (Megan) Barry put together. The topic? Community solar. Every time we turn around.

"There was a project in Spartanburg, S.C., that was largely surrounded by community solar that Harold Mitchell put together. It's one of those things you're going to see more and more."

Aries is putting the finishing touches on a 1.37-megawatt community solar project for Appalachian Electric Co-op in New Market. The company in August broke ground on Tennessee's first utility-scale community solar installation, which will serve 35,000 members in the electric cooperative.

The Tennessee Valley Authority provided a grant for the AEC project, and costs will be fully funded through revenue generated via power purchase agreement with TVA.

"(TVA provides) low cost and reliable power," Abouelata said. "We're very fortunate, because that's a huge part of economic development for Tennessee. Tennessee is on the map because of those partnerships with TVA. And TVA getting behind renewable energy has been huge in the economic development in Tennessee. ...

"Bringing the two together, utilities and renewable energy, has been brilliant, because millions of dollars have come into our state and it has been an economic boom because they have supported solar."

Aries made news in September when it announced a working agreement with SMS Energy Group of North Carolina to expand its large-scale solar projects in the Southeast. The venture will allow both companies to take advantage of the other's strengths.

"SMS Energy is a company that has a long history with utilities," Abouelata said. "They've got tons of experience over there. We've got tons of experience on the solar side of it. We're going to hit North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee very hard with this working relationship, and take advantage of each other's skills. That's pretty exciting. That puts us into a whole different world, because now we have that utility, high-voltage experience mixed with (our experience).

"We've been working with them on bids and sharing each other's knowledge base. It makes us both stronger, so we're excited about that."

SMS Energy Group also has operations in South Carolina. Aries is evaluating the Aiken, Columbia, Greeneville and Spartanburg markets and soon will open an office in South Carolina. The office will initially be home to one full-time salesperson, but the company expects to hire several more employees there by the end of 2017.

Jonathan Hamilton, who joined Aries earlier this year as a customer service manager, will lead the Southeast expansion.

Abouelata said that the time was right for Aries to develop a working agreement with SMS.

"The growth idea, one of the things for us and SMS getting together, is we realize that growth is going to be in the utility side," he said. "They realize they're getting more customers asking for solar, so they needed a solar partner. We just came together. The timing was right. It was perfect."

Knoxville helps pave way for Grow Bioplastics

Grow Bioplastics is a Knoxville startup company that is working to commercialize plant-based biodegradable plastic made from lignin, a renewable waste stream from the paper industry.

It also is the epitome of what entrepreneurship is in the Knoxville area. The company has been touched by the University of Tennessee, the UT Research Foundation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Knoxville Entrepreneur Center, Knoxville Chamber of Commerce and others.

"The number of people that have come up to us, offering just their assistance, free conversations, that has been the biggest part," said Tony Bova, 32, co-founder of Grow Bioplastics. "And the fact that it is so tight-knit, that everybody knows each other personally. Honestly, that's been the biggest of all it.

"How quickly we've been introduced in a matter of nine months to all of these parties, and they're all interested in what we're doing and eager to help drive that mission, that Knoxville is good for this."

Grow Bioplastics' goal as a company is to create a family of plastics that have applications throughout industry. It currently is focused on plastic mulch film.

Mulch film is used in farming to keep soil warm and moist. It extends the growing season for plants and blocks weeds. The problem, Bova said, is that farmers have to remove the plastic and send it to a landfill. Only about 10 percent gets recycled, mostly because it is covered in pesticides and recycling facilities won't take it, or will charge an extra fee.

"What we're trying to do is make a material that has the same properties, and performs just as well for all of their uses, but at the end of the season, they can just plow it into the ground where it will break down naturally because it is biodegradable material," Bova said.

The idea for Grow Bioplastics came in 2014 while Bova was taking an entrepreneurship course for his Ph.D. program at UT. The challenge in the course was to find different pieces of intellectual property that either existed at ORNL or UTRF and do a business model canvas around it. Through the advice of Tom Rogers, the director for industrial partnerships and economic development at ORNL, Bova picked a technology based on lignin-based plastics.

"I was fascinated by them," Bova said. "I really fell in love with that technology and I switched my research group in the Ph.D. to go work for the inventor of that technology out at Oak Ridge, Dr. Amit Naskar."

Several people are named on the patent for the technology, which is licensed by TennEra. According to Bova, Grow Bioplastics is in talks with TennEra to work out a sub-license agreement so that it can have access to that portion of the technology.

Bova and a team of students entered a pitch competition from another class based on the technology "just to see what our class work had put together," Bova said.

Grow Bioplastics won.

"It was like, $1,000, and we split it between the four of us," Bova said. "We didn't yet have a company, and at the time, we were talking about making 3-D printing materials out of lignin. And then I took a few more entrepreneurship classes. I took plenty, as many as I could."

Bova credited the Ph.D. program at UT's Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, which unites resources and capabilities from UT and ORNL to promote advanced research and to provide innovative solutions to global challenges in energy, engineering and computation. Bova's undergraduate work was in chemistry. Co-founder Jeff Beegle is a biosystems engineer.

"We have people who are nuclear engineers, computer scientists, geographers. All of us focusing on different aspects of energy in general," Bova said. "As part of the interdisciplinary need, we are required to take a few classes in either entrepreneurship or public policy. I took one in public policy. It was interesting and I learned a lot. And I took one in entrepreneurship, which I was interested in before I came here, and was just hooked."

Since then, Bova has taken as many entrepreneurship classes as possible. One was a MBA course called "New Venture Planning" taught by Lynn Youngs, the executive director of the Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the Haslam College of Business.

"In that class, I took that idea we originally had and worked with another team of students to pose a new question," Bova said. "What's a better application than 3-D printing, what's higher volume and something that's specifically targeting these biodegradeable plastics? That's where the mulch film idea came out of."

By the end of semester, Bova and his team had a full business plan in addition to one-page canvases. Bova emailed Youngs, saying "This is really interesting. I'm really actively pursuing this in the future and I'd really like to sit down and talk with you about it."

"He was like 'I don't know if you realize, but with this business plan, you have everything you need to start one,' " Bova said. " 'Start entering some of these competitions if you want to raise money, but get your business going. What better time than now? Don't wait.' "

So, on Dec. 29, 2015, Bova was in Chicago with his girlfriend, visiting her parents for the holidays.

"It was maybe one in the morning and I couldn't sleep," Bova said. "So I decided to start a business. I popped open the secretary of state website and entered all of my information and $300 later, I had an LLC. I was like 'Wow, this is really great.'

"I talked to Lynn later and he said 'Yeah, you probably should have waited until Jan. 1 because then you wouldn't have to pay the mandatory tax for those two days that you existed.' ... It's a fun story."

Since then, Grow Bioplastics has entered several business competitions. It started with "What's the Big Idea," hosted by the KEC and the Knoxville Chamber of Commerce.

"We had a three-day bootcamp weekend where we really dove into what the business model would be and we learned a whole lot," Bova said. "We didn't win."

Grow Bioplastics then entered the Rice Business Plan Competition in Houston.

"That experience, I think, has shaped us the most because we were immediately thrust into a situation where we weren't being judged by judges, but actual investors, industry experts," Bova said. "There were 300 different judges across the competition. We pitched four times, each to a room of at least 20 people, and we had great, great feedback and we evolved a lot in our presentation skills and everything there."

Grow Bioplastics has since been accepted to 14 competitions and won a total of $68,500 in cash prizes.

"It's super exciting," Bova said. "We've gone from $300 out of pocket to just over $68,000 in non-equity funding. We've come quite a long way. Now we're in the process of writing some additional grants to a few government funding agencies to get up a bit more funding and looking to bring on our first employees in the next three or four months so we can be ready for the next phase."

Grow Bioplastics has been invited to the SXSW Eco pitch showcase in Austin, Texas. It's a three-day event featuring "a ton of people, all of them interested in sustainability and green things in some way, shape or form."

Bova said that he has since learned that Grow Bioplastics wasn't ready for the competition at Rice in April.

"We had only been around for four months and hadn't been able to craft everything and understand exactly what we were," he said. "But now we have a much better understanding of that. SXSW is a well-recognized name on a national stage. It's really exciting for us to be able to get to that point where we can go and ask for the support, either connections or funding, that we need to get us to the next step."

Grow Bioplastics has proved that it can make some of the material in a lab. The next challenge is to show it can produce the material on a large scale and that it can make the plastic in a continuous production.

"The way we make them right now is small batches at a time," Bova said. "I can maybe make 25 to 300 grams, so like a pound of it at a time. So, moving forward to something where we can show that we have continuous production and a smoother manufacturing process and then getting a partner in the plastics processing industry that can be interested in helping us get this to a point to where we can form it into these thin films for that specific application. Those are our biggest milestones right now.

"So, can we make a lot of it? And does it actually do what we say it does? Which, from an educated standpoint, based on all of the literature we have and all of the results we have, it should. But we want to make sure all of those claims are sound and we have science to back them up."

The Knoxville entrepreneur community has been a huge help to Bova and Grow Bioplastics.

"The groundswell of support has been the biggest help," Bova said. "We won the Vol Court competition that was sponsored by the Anderson Center at UT two times in 2014, with our first idea of 3-D printing materials, and this past spring. The prize for that was $1,500, which is enough money for us to fill out more paperwork and get to the next point where we are applying for things, a little bit of travel money that allowed us to go to Rice.

"But we also got a year of free legal services from David Morehous, who is a local lawyer in the startup community, a year of free office space at the research incubator, and then a year of free consulting for finance and general business consulting from Pershing Yoakley & Associates, specifically from Tom Ballard. And I think those three things alone ... have been way more valuable than the dollars. Because, one, it has a dollar value to it, but at this stage in our company, money won't teach us the things that we don't know. Those things will."

Bova, originally from Mentor, Ohio, near Cleveland, is thankful he chose to pursue his Ph.D. at the University of Tennessee.

"Knoxville is a newer, more progressive city, so there is definitely a different vibe here than the other places that I've lived, and I really like it," he said. "It feels like this new, young community. There's almost something new opening once or twice a month, be it a new restaurant or some other new business. I like to see that kind of growth and I'm excited to be part of it.

"To be honest, when I came here, I didn't know if I would stay here after I graduated. Now I think that I might for a while. With the business side of things, all of the pieces are starting to fall into place. We can locate ourselves here. There are people who are really encouraged that we may stay and really offering to help us get to that point.

"The knowledge base that exists between Oak Ridge and UT, it's so invaluable. There's a lot of really intelligent people here, who we can potentially hire as employees, or in the future, have as mentors."

The Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, IACMI, in partnership with DuPont Performance Materials, Fibrtec Inc. and Purdue University, in a news release announced the launch of the first project selected with a dual focus on decreasing the manufacturing cost and increasing design flexibility for automotive composites.  Advancements in both areas can open new opportunities and become an enabler for large scale deployment of composite parts.

Multiple factors, including cost and design constraints, present barriers to the adoption of composites in high volume automotive applications. This IACMI project will address both critical areas through a fundamentally different approach to the manufacturing of carbon fiber composites versus those currently in use.

The work will build on synergies of differentiated technologies. Flexible coated tow manufactured by Fibrtec will be formed into flexible fabric prepregs using a Rapid Fabric Formation (RFF) technology along with a proprietary polyamide resin both by DuPont. The final component will benefit from increased production speeds of the tow manufacturing process and the fabric forming process resulting in a lower cost of manufacture.

Composite parts made by this process have been shown to have low voids and good mechanical properties when consolidated by traditional techniques. The flexible fabric prepregs have also been shown to have good draping behavior in molding experiments. Researchers in the Purdue University Composites Manufacturing and Simulation Center will work with the team to model and validate drapability and part performance.

 High cycle time for production of continuous carbon fiber thermoplastic composites increases costs.  The use of emerging materials for impregnation and new approaches for tow coating and fabric formation are expected to significantly lower production costs of high volume composites.

"By leveraging the strengths of all project partners, we have the potential to create a unique commercially viable path to high volume, low cost thermoplastic composite automotive components," Jan Sawgle, DuPont Performance Materials project manager, said in the release.

Industry partners have been enthusiastic to engage in project proposals to leverage IACMI resources and collaborate with members on the deployment of high impact advanced composites.

 "By partnering with industry to solve manufacturing challenges, we're advancing clean energy innovations that will help propel United States manufacturing and competitiveness," Craig Blue, IACMI-The Composites Institute CEO, said in the release.

Socially Equal Energy Efficient Development, or SEEED, has backing of the Knoxville city officials and TVA to weatherize about 1,300 homes.

Next week the organization will present a workshop 6:30 p.m. Sept. 24 at the Morningside Community Center in East Knoxville to tell people how weatherization can help lower their utility bills.

SEEED, which runs career-training programs for youth, will be canvassing neighborhoods and handing out LED light bulbs with volunteer support.

The SEEED program comes out of an IBM Smarter Cities Challenge, which found in 2013 that emergency utility payments go to roughly 10,000 households annually in the community, a cost that can run up to $5 million.

Those interested in the meeting or getting involved with SEEED can call the main office at 865-766-5185, or visit

Starting in November, city employees will begin planting 500 canopy and large shade trees in areas that need more tree cover.

A state Department of Agriculture grant for $20,000 will be matched by an additional $20,000 in local funds.

Trees will be planted on North Broadway, Clinton Highway, Hall of Fame Drive, Island Home Avenue, Middlebrook Pike, Park Ridge, Sherrill Boulevard, the Cal Johnson Recreation Center and the safety building.

Planting should be complete by March. This is the second year the city has boosted treecover -- in 2014 about 600 trees were planted throughout the city.

Vonore-based biomass supply company Genera Energy has created a mobile crop planning and learning tool for the biomass industry.

"Often times it's very difficult to help technology users to understand the intricacies of the different biomass crops that are available for their use," said Sam Jackson, vice president of business development for Genera.

The app should help both growers of feedstock and users of the resulting biomass product -- whether that's actually as fuel or as an ingredient in plastics, polymers or other things -- understand their needs and scale, he said.

The Biomass app offers features such as a biomass crop library complete with detailed information, photos and range maps for the most utilized biomass crops in the U.S., along with the ability to overlap crop ranges in a live, interactive map function.

Another key function is a multi-function biomass calculator that helps the user determine how much biomass they'll need for their specific situation, including conversion technology, conversion rate, and location. For those wishing to convert biomass to biofuels, biochemical, bioproducts, or biopower, this app will provide realistic projections and crop suggestions based on actual, in-the-field studies and crop outcomes.

The app is currently free and available for both Apple and Android products.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Cortney Roark published on October 17, 2016 2:51 PM.

More contractors needed for Knoxville Extreme Energy Makeover was the previous entry in this blog.

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